Janet Sumner Johnson
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NaNoWriMo!

Nov 03, 2014 Uncategorized 9 comments

So it’s here. The dreaded (or anticipated . . . however you look at it) month. I’m not sure how I’ll fit it all in, but after the great experience I had last year, I’m jumping in with two feet again this year.

As a result, I will not be around on the blog much, but I will be back in December, and I promise to report.

In the meantime, enjoy the view with me:

So are any of you joining in? If yes, shoot me your NaNo username and I’ll add you as a buddy. Mine is MsVerbose.

Have a happy Thanksgiving! See you on the other side. πŸ™‚


Revealing My Secret and an Interview

Oct 27, 2014 Uncategorized 3 comments
So I have this secret.
 
Okay, maybe it’s not as secret as I like to think. I love picture books. Like LOVE. I check them out at the library by the dozens, and tell myself they’re “for the kids.” Ha! Nope. Definitely for me.
 
But the real secret is that I want to write picture books. I have played at it for years. Studied the greats endlessly. Taken classes at conferences. Paid for critiques by professionals. Even written several ugly drafts of would be stories. But I could tell I had a long way to go.
 
So when my lovely CP (Dee Romito) told me she had signed up for an online picture book writing class called “Making Picture Book Magic,” I was all ears. And then, THEN, she told me it was by one of my favorite author/bloggers (who I also consider a friend), Susanna Leonard Hill. I didn’t even know she had a class! So of course I signed up right away.
 
Her class is so popular, I had to wait a few months to get in, but let me tell you, it blew me away! It’s not even that she told me anything I didn’t already know. But the way she broke everything down into the perfect sized daily lessons was awesome. It felt like I had a friend walking me through the process from start to finish. I felt productive. Capable. Excited to write!
 
And even better, as part of the lessons, there was a facebook group where we could share and discuss with the other participants and get feedback from Susanna (and each other). And let me tell you, the feedback was pure gold. GOLD. And not just the feedback on my work. I learned tons reading the feedback on the others’ work.
 
Honestly, the money I paid for Susanna’s class is the best spent money I have ever put into my writing career.
 
I was so excited by the class, that I asked Susanna if she would be my guest on the blog and answer a few questions. And she said yes! So I welcome Susanna to my blog.
 
Me: When did you begin your Making Picture Book Magic class, and what inspired you to do so?
 
Susanna: I started Making Picture Book Magic in February 2012, after I’d spent the better part of 9 months writing the course, beta testing it, and commissioning art to decorate the lessons and inspire writers.  I got the idea for the class because I do critiques for people on a pretty regular basis, and I found that many of the manuscripts I received from beginning writers were showing similar types of problems.  It got me to thinking that maybe I could offer a class that covered some of the basics.  I wanted the class to be interactive so that people would have the opportunity to ask questions, not just generally about writing, but specifically about the stories they were working on.  I wanted writers to be able to learn from each other as well as from me.  I wanted the class to be affordable, because lots of writers don’t have a lot of money to spend on such things.  I also wanted it to be something the average person could manage in the small amounts of time they could find in their busy life.  So that was my aim.  You’ve taken the class, so you can say if you think I succeeded or not πŸ™‚
 
Me: Yes! You definitely succeeded. I particularly loved being able to ask specific questions about my work. So helpful!
 
So let’s talk about your writing. One of my favorite books of yours is Can’t Sleep Without Sheep. My kids and I (and my husband) were cracking up! I think the cows were my favorite. Where did you get your inspiration for that book? How long did it take you to write it?
 
Susanna: I’m so glad you like Can’t Sleep πŸ™‚  I owe that story to my son and a mattress commercial.  (And yes, I know the main character in the story is a girl, and there are no mattresses to be seen :))  When my son was little, he wasn’t big on sleep.  Every night he’d get in bed and have what he called his “thinking time.”  Many nights, long after I thought he was asleep and had gone to bed myself, he’d come into our room wide awake and full of questions.  “What’s the temperature of the sun?”  “How many teeth does a t-rex have?”  “Where does the wind come from?” To which I would answer knowledgeably, “Uh….”  I’d take him back to bed, tuck him in, and tell him to count sheep, sitting beside him in the dark while he did so until he finally drifted off.  When I got to writing the story, for some reason (maybe so he wouldn’t know I was talking about him :)) I changed the main character to a girl.  But by itself a story about a child with a busy mind who couldn’t fall asleep was not enough.  I had that part rolling around in the back of my mind for a while, unwritten, unfinished, because I knew it needed more.  Then one day, when I was driving the kids to school, a commercial came on the radio.  It said something like, “Tired of counting sheep?  Buy our mattress!”  And I thought to myself, what if instead of getting tired of counting sheep, the sheep got tired of being counted?  And that’s when I finally had a story πŸ™‚  The actual writing only took a few hours, but I’d been thinking about it for ages.
 
Me: It amazes me how much of ‘writing’ is really ‘thinking.’ And I love hearing how a story is born. So fascinating!
 
Seven of your picture books have been published. Have you ever considered dabbling in longer stories? Why or why not?
 
Susanna: I have considered it!  In fact, I have attempted it!  I have 4 completed novels (and by completed I mean I got to “The End” but boy do they need work!) and about 10 others in various stages.  I am the queen of jumping in, writing 30-45 pages, and then realizing I have no idea what I’m doing or where I’m going.  But I would love to figure it out, so I’m still working on it πŸ™‚

Me: Haha! Sounds familiar. I always feel bad about the unfinished books of mine. Maybe someday I’ll go back. πŸ™‚
 
Through your blog, you began the Perfect Picture Book database a couple of years ago. It is so useful, and I’ve learned of so many great books through it. Can you tell us a little about this, and what inspired you to start it (I seem to be all about inspiration today!)?
 
Susanna: My younger sister-in-law is actually responsible for inspiring Perfect Picture Books.  She asked me a couple different times if I knew of good picture books about one topic or another, and it got me to thinking that there were probably a lot of parents out there who didn’t have the kind of background we writers have in what’s out there for kids to read.  I thought it might be helpful if they had a place to go where they could find excellent, highly recommended picture books on various topics and themes.  Then I thought I could take it a step further (as long as I was doing it anyway :)) and add resources to the reviews so that parents, teachers and homeschoolers could easily find ways to expand on the use of picture books at home and in the classroom.  I knew it would take me a REALLY long time to build up a data base by myself, so I threw it out into the blogosphere to see who might want to do it with me, thereby finding a terrific group of people who show up every week with great picture books to share.  (I have to publicly confess, though, that keeping the list properly updated is a HUGE job and I have fallen woefully behind.  I am working on catching up, but the data base always lags well behind the books that have been done!  If anyone happens to be looking for an unpaid job, call me :))
 
Me: Hmmm . . . I might just be contacting you myself. What a great thing to be a part of!
 
Okay, okay, I’ve taken enough of your time, but I have to throw out a couple of fun ones. First, I have shared many a dessert with you on your blog. What, amongst all your offerings is your very favorite?
 
Susanna: Asking me to choose a favorite dessert is like asking me to choose a favorite child, Janet!  How can you?!  Let’s see…  How about three favorites?  1. Gingerbread with hot fudge sauce and whipped cream.  2. Apple crisp with vanilla ice cream.  3. Chocolate mousse cake.  Oh, and brownies with coffee ice cream.  Okay.  That’s it.  Oh, except there’s nothing like a freshly baked oatmeal raisin cookie!  Okay. That’s really it.  Oh, except fresh cider donuts, especially this time of year, which aren’t technically dessert, but really you can eat them any time!   Okay.  I’ll stop.  But now I’m hungry.  What have you got?  It might be a new favorite πŸ™‚

Me: Haha! I do ask the hard-hitting questions, don’t I? And yum. Now you have me drooling. Fresh cider donuts sound amazing right now! Alas, all I have to offer is a bucket or two of Halloween candy.
 
So, on to the most important question of all (I mean, this is ME, you had to know this was coming) what would your personalized license plate be? Or if you’d rather, you can tell us the personalized license plate for one of your characters. Punxatawny Phillis might have quite an interesting one. πŸ™‚
 
Susanna: Oh gosh!  This is a hard one!  I’m not good at these. Maybe WRITRGRL?  Or GHOGSRUL?  Or LUVCHOCL8? πŸ™‚  Maybe you’d better think one up for me!
 
Me: Oh dear. I’m afraid you’ve used too many letters in those plates. You are only allowed 7. πŸ˜‰ Let me offer some suggestions: PBWRITR; GHOGPWR (Groundhog power); I ROCK; I WRITE or perhaps LVDSSRT (Love Dessert). What do you think?
 
Susanna, thanks again for stopping in! And I hope you all have a great day. πŸ˜€
 
Susanna Leonard Hill grew up in New York City with her mom and dad, one sister
and two brothers, and an assortment of cats. Her first published book was The House That Mack Built,
released by Little Simon in 2002. Since then, she has published six more books: Punxsutawney Phyllis (Holiday House, 2005), Taxi! (Little Simon, 2005), No Sword
Fighting In The House (Holiday House, 2007), Not Yet,
Rose (Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, 2009), and Airplane Flight! and Freight Train
Trip! (Little Simon, 2009.) Can’t Sleep Without
Sheep, released Fall of 2010 (Walker Books), is illustrated by Mike
Wohnoutka, and Jeff Ebbeler is illustrating April Fools,
Phyllis!, released in 2011 (
Holiday House).

You can find her on her blog a http://www.susannahill.com

 


Where’s Lenny Lee . . . Birthday Bash

Oct 20, 2014 Uncategorized 7 comments

Today, a special friend of mine is turning 15, and I wanted to give a shout out:

Happy Birthday
Lenny!

I have known Lenny (via blogging) for almost 5 years now, and it has been a privilege to be even the teensiest part of his life. He spreads sunshine wherever he goes. I only have to see his name to start grinning because that’s how powerful his influence is. He inspires me to be better. To be happier. To see the good in others. Thank you, Lenny! Thank you for being my friend!

If you don’t know Lenny, you should go meet him (he blogs HERE). Like, now. Okay, maybe like in a few minutes, because you don’t want to miss what comes next.

Lenny, just for you, because I love you that much, I have prepared a vlog. A VLOG! I’m afraid it’s hard to hear, for which I apologize, but anyway . . . ENJOY! (Seriously YouTube? You made THAT the thumbnail? *sigh*)

We all love and miss you Lenny! Please (super pretty please with sugar and a cherry on top!) come back to blogging!!

Or, as my personalized-license-plate-infatuated-self would say:  CUMBACK


This vs. That: Snowboarding vs. Skiing

Oct 13, 2014 Uncategorized 3 comments

So I haven’t done this in forever, but I’m feeling in the mood for something light and fun, so here we go. Drumroll, please!

Skiing? Snowboarding? What did the masses choose? . . .

Total votes: 13

Snowboarding: 5 votes; 38%
Skiing: 8 votes; 62%
I voted skiing because I have never been snowboarding, but I’m kindof curious to try it. And at the same time, maybe not interested enough to give up my skis. Because I’m pretty good on skis. So why give up proficiency to learn something new, right? Okay, not right, but there we are.

How about you? If given the chance, would you try something new, or go with the tried and true? Gee, maybe that should be the next This vs. That! (Except I have a better one . . .)

Royals
 
vs.
 
Orioles

Controlling our Destinies

Oct 06, 2014 Uncategorized 5 comments

“Our decisions determine our destiny.” ~Thomas S. Monson

There is so much in life that we can’t control. So much that seems to affect who we are, who we will become, and in fact, our very destinies. I heard a snippet of an interview on NPR with an actor from That Seventy’s Show, and they were talking about how much there is out of our control that determines our “success.” (I put success in quotes, because that’s a matter of definition, isn’t it?)

The interviewer commented that making it big is not just about getting out there and working hard. He knows plenty of people who have been there working hard for a lot of years. People who have worked just as hard if not harder than the ones who DID make it big. So it’s not just about work. It’s about work, and luck, and timing, and the stars aligning, and Jupiter being in its 3rd rotation of the 5th lunar cycle and blah, blah, blah.

I’ve been thinking about this a lot this past week. In truth, we can work hard and never achieve that “success” that we all dream of. So much of that is out of our control.

But we can control our destinies. How do we react when we get that rejection? Do we throw our notebook across the room and refuse to ever write another word? Do we scream and rant and blame others for not giving us what we wanted? For sabotaging us? Or do we pick our tarnished pride up off the floor, wipe away the dust and move onward? Learn from experience?

ο»ΏMost of us will probably never make it big. But that doesn’t mean we can’t have bright destinies and leave a trail of shining good in our wake. It doesn’t mean that we can’t leave the world just a little better than we found it through our actions.

Because we can control that. We can control how we act and react to everything we face . . . good and bad. And that is what determines our destinies.

Have you ever felt proud for how you reacted in a bad situation?


In Which the Ten-Year-Old Takes Over

Sep 29, 2014 Uncategorized 7 comments

Today, I am going to turn my blog over to my ten-year-old. He is a devourer of books, and tells me he could talk about books for days and days. So without further ado, here he is:

I find books very fascinating because they are able to take you to places you wouldn’t be able to go in real life. And when you are focused on a book, it starts to come alive in your mind. Pictures soaring through your thoughts. Personally, I prefer realistic fiction, and fantasy, and historical fiction.

I also enjoy mystery books. A to Z Mysteries are especially enjoyable. I find it quite interesting because in the mysteries they start asking the questions about who it could be and then they take their thoughts into an experiment and go through it like the scientific method.

My favorite book is called ICE FIRE by Chris D’Lacey which is the 2nd book of the Last Dragon trilogy. It is a very enjoyable book and when you read it, it feels like you are entirely swept away to another world.

For generations a family has created clay dragons that live and breathe fire. They can create these dragons because they are descendants of the last dragon. Then one day, a young boy comes to them as an exchange college student, and he discovers their secret. Later on during ICE FIRE, a witch tries to force the family to create her a real dragon, unlike the clay ones. The young boy is caught up in an enchantment by this witch and has to find his way out and save the day.

The reason I like ICE FIRE is because it doesn’t reveal everything that’s going on in the beginning. It kept me turning pages because I wanted to find out what was going on.

What is your favorite book? Why?


Sunny Days to Come

Sep 22, 2014 Uncategorized 6 comments

On the drive from Utah to Missouri, we had this gorgeous view:

 My camera is slow, and by the time the picture took, there was that car. But I kind of love the picture more for that. In life, we all face dark times.

Maybe we have family troubles. Maybe we have health issues. Maybe someone we love is struggling.

Whatever it is, whatever we are going through, there is always light at the end. Sunny days will come. That rainbow will light our way. Things will get better.

I can’t help but look at this picture and smile for the good things to come.

Stay strong, my friends! Things will get better.


Summer is Over

Sep 15, 2014 Uncategorized 7 comments
Hello! I’m back! Summer has ended and time has sped up. In fact, I blinked and now it’s the middle of September. Crazy!
 
Now I’m trying to remember what I actually did this summer. Let’s see . . . 
. . . and gosh this list is boring. So instead of babbling on, I’ll just bid you all a happy halloo!
 
 What have you all been up to?


Summer Break!

Jul 14, 2014 Uncategorized 5 comments

Summer is now in full swing, and rather than fight, I’ve decided to succumb and embrace the crazy. So I’ll be taking a blogging break from now to the end of August.

In the mean time, here are some summer pictures to enjoy:

The last day of school:

The Drive-in:

Fireworks:

And of course, Ice Cream!

Have a great summer!


High Heels and Science: Being Girly is Okay

Jul 07, 2014 Uncategorized 14 comments

So this past week or so, this article about a Verizon
commercial has been going around:

“Powerful Ad Shows What A Little Girl Hears When You Tell Her She’s Pretty”

After watching the commercial, I have all kinds of things going through my head.
Things that have been swirling about for a while now, and I am tired of holding
it in. First, as a parent, I tell my boys not to get their clothes muddy, too.
Because, LAUNDRY. Need I say more? And who are they to tell us what a girl hears
when you tell her she’s pretty? I’m a girl. I know just fine what I hear.

Because here is the thing: my personal experience as a girl
was pretty much the opposite. No one took tools from me and said ‘let your
brother do that.’ Everyone told me how great I was at science and math. From
parents, to teachers, to professors. And knowing how much of a braggart I must
sound, I was great at it. All my
highest test scores and best/easiest grades were in math and science.

Everyone encouraged me to go into a science, depending on
what subject they favored: My orthodontist told me I should be an orthodontist.
My engineer dad encouraged me to be an engineer. My HS and college math
professors said I should major in math. My physical science professor
encouraged me to major in science.

And they were all men. They saw potential, they encouraged.
Good on them! Exactly what the ad said adults should be doing. And what the ad
suggests they aren’t doing. Keep in mind, I am old. Like in my 30’s *wink,* so this
was back in the day women were discouraged from science, right?

By all accounts, I should have been in that 18% mentioned in
the ad. Because I liked science. And I STILL liked it when I got to college.
Plus, I was encouraged, which,
according to this ad, simply doesn’t happen for girls. And right up until my
first semester of college, I planned to be an engineer.

So what happened? What went wrong???

Nothing.

That first semester, I realized that the classes that I loved
were not math and science. So I switched. Majored in English. And I am one of
those people who was somehow “failed” by society because I didn’t
major in science. Or so this study tells me.

Well I am here to tell you that I was not
“failed.” I did not fall out of love with math and science because
society discouraged me or told me I couldn’t be good at it. I simply loved
other stuff more. I know it is not politically correct to suggest that gender
might be an influence, but there it is.

In no way do I mean to suggest that there won’t be women
out there who love science best. Of course there are. And actually, I know and love quite a few of them. But why make the other
82% feel like crap for not choosing science? MUST we choose it simply because
we can? Simply because others aren’t?

I read an article where the author makes a conscious effort not to talk clothes or hair or pretty with little girls. And while I love a lot about the article, I was left with a
question: What if a girl loves fashion? What if she loves make-up? What if she
wants to cut hair? Are those desires unacceptable now? Are those subjects not
“smart” enough? Not educated enough?

The coveted high heels
Because I have a little girl who loves all of that stuff.
And trust me, this is not me thrusting girliness upon her. I was a Tomboy with
a capital ‘T.’ I loved sports and taking things apart and running around
without a shirt because my brothers could. So imagine my surprise when my own
daughter is not like that. When my own daughter insists on cute girly froofy
skirts that poof when she spins. When all she wants for her birthday is a pair
of high heels (I don’t even wear high heels!).
 
“But these jeans!” I say, “Don’t you want to
wear jeans? Like Mama?”

Nope, she’s having none of it. She knows what she likes, and
who I am to discourage that simply because the world says she should love
science, and sports, and stuff that is not cutesy? Stuff that is “educated.”

I have just read so many articles and seen so many ads (I’m
talking to you, GoldieBlox with your anti-pink Super Bowl ad)
on what you should and shouldn’t say to little girls, and what you should and
shouldn’t give. I worry that the swing from healthy encouragement of letting girls
be who they choose to be has switched to discouraging little girls from doing
things that are esteemed to be “girly.” Pink is not okay. Dresses are
oppression incarnate. Choosing to teach or study English, or heavens, stay at home
to raise children is letting societal stereotypes guide your life.

I assure you, it is not. And with that, I claim pink to be an
acceptable color, dolls to be acceptable toys, and dresses to be acceptable
attire.

In no way do I mean to belittle women who choose science. I
LOVE science! I think it’s great when women choose thatβ€”as long as it is their
choice and not society forcing it upon them. I am sure there are girls who did
not get the encouragement that I did. Girls who maybe would have gone into a
science. And for that, I am sorry. Just as sorry as I am for girls who are put
down for liking pink.

I defend the rights of girls to choose science or NOT. The
rights of girls to love pink, blue, orange, black, fuscia, or all of them. To be a girly
girl, a tomboy, or a mix of the two as they so choose.
Society would vilify these words. Tell you they are insults. But I disagree! To
be Girly is a joyous and beautiful thing. I know because I see it daily with my
own daughter. To be a Tomboy is exciting and a daily adventure. I know because
I lived it.

There is room for all of it, and we need to find a way to
encourage the one without denigrating the other (whatever your preference may
be).